AGTA NewsFlash 

March 20, 2009

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Code of Ethics and Invoice Reminder
The AGTA has been at the forefront of enhancement and treatment disclosure, specifically by requiring Members to disclose gemstone enhancements on commercial documents and to annually reaffirm their commitment to abide by AGTA's Code of Ethics.

If you have not returned your Code of Ethics Form, please review the Code of Ethics that can be found on www.agta.org and reaffirm your commitment by signing the Code of Ethics Form.

If you have not submitted a copy of your invoice, please send it to joshua@agta.org to demonstrate your disclosure and treatment compliance.

Both items can be faxed to 214-742-7334. If you have questions, contact the AGTA office at 800-972-1162.

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David Michael Trout 1957 - 2009
"One of the things I like best about what I do is the number of lives I touch," says David Trout, his blue eyes alive with light. "I enjoy talking to people, listening to their ideas, and creating a work of art that will be around for generations. This is truly a responsibility both to nature and our clients for creating such an important piece in someone's life and helping them immortalize a piece of family history." David Trout touched many people's lives and most would agree their lives are better having known him.

David Trout, our family member and lifelong friend, passed away unexpectedly on Sunday, March 15, 2009. As an avid athlete, David enjoyed many sports including biking, golf, skiing and hiking. He passed away while hiking Camelback Mountain. Even though David is no longer with us, his spirit and legacy will live on. If you spent any time with David, you soon realized he was 'that boy' who always got sent to the hall in elementary school but could always win over the teachers with his impish and infectious smile. He often said, "When I was younger I thought my name was Damn it David, because that is what my mom kept yelling at me." His quick wit and genuine manner were the reasons that people were drawn to him. His charm and honesty were why you stayed.

As one of the founding partners of Coffin & Trout Fine Jewellers, his training began at an early age with his father, Marty Trout, who decided that stained glassmaking would be the key to keeping a strong connection with his son. In an entrepreneurial move - and, as always, supported by his mother Barbara Trout - father and son approached the owner of the local jewelry store in Rock Island, Illinois to see if he would be interested in selling their artwork. Not only did the owner agree, he eventually offered the young artist an apprenticeship position servicing watches. And, at the age of 13, David began his entry into the jewelry business. The emerging designer wore many hats in the industry before finally meeting his business partner, Randy Coffin, in 1979. They quickly became friends and the creative spark was lit. In 1984 Coffin & Trout Fine Jewellers was born. David's creative designs garnered him numerous international design awards including nine Spectrum Awards and The Gemological Institute of America's 'Best of the Best' exhibit. David Trout's legacy will live on in Coffin & Trout Fine Jewellers as we continue to bring innovative and imaginative designs for years to come.

David was also very active in supporting his community. Always helping on one charity event or another, his most active and current role was as the President of Phoenix Suns Charities. He was passionate about the Phoenix Suns and the work that the Suns Charities does for the community. His charitable work and dedication for our community will be missed. But most of all, Dave Trout, you will be dearly missed.

In lieu of flowers, donations should be sent to:

Phoenix Suns Charities
P.O. Box 1369
In Memory of David Trout
Phoenix, Arizona 85001

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The Complicated History of Mozambique Cuprian "Paraiba-like" Tourmalines
by Mary L. Johnson, Ph.D. (www.maryjohnsonconsulting.com)
Recently, there have been suggestions (James 2009a, 2009b, 2009c; Wise 2009) that the copper-bearing tourmalines from Mozambique may owe their copper, and hence their color, to elemental (bulk or grain-boundary) diffusion-that is, to treatment. However, tourmalines are complicated minerals and grow in complex environments. If we understand these tourmalines' history, we can assess whether diffusion treatment is necessary to explain the features seen in these gemstones. Click here for the full report.

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